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Sailing Forces

We passionately believe we can be of great service to injured and recovering personnel on a variety of levels, from our extensive experience, to our profound slogan ‘Changing Lives’, we are a credible source for rehabilitation. With over 1500 recovering injured servicemen between 2001 and 2010 from Afghanistan alone, there is a huge opportunity for the Jubilee Sailing Trust to be of service.

We are proud to announce that Royal Navy and Royal Marines Charity are encouraging servicemen to apply for grants to sail with the Jubilee Sailing Trust.

For further information please contact the Grants Administrator on 023 9254 8191 or mygrant@rnrmc.org.uk

royal marines logo

Connaught Trust

JST forces rehabilitationGrants of up to 90% of the cost of participating on voyages are available to members of the reserve forces and cadets of all three services that meet the qualifying criteria of the Trust. For more information please visit our bursary web page here.

In 2011 the JST is honored to welcome on board our tall ships the 40 Commando, Coldstream guards, Grenadier guards and the Rifles.

“The experience those five Guardsmen will gain from their sailing expedition will be immeasurable and will teach them that although they may have lost limbs there is still much that thy can achieve in life. It will also be a wonderful break for them which is just as important” – David Sage – voyage crew and fundraiser for the Coldstream Guards

Experiences from Afghan veterans

Forces RehabilitationSoldiers wounded in Afghanistan have battled back from horrific injuries to take to the ocean waves. Four Grenadier Guardsmen joined the crew of the sailing ship Lord Nelson for a week-long trip around the Canary Islands. They hauled ropes, steered the ship, cleaned and cooked and even climbed the rigging on their 311-nautical mile trip. That’s quite a challenge when you have to get about on a pair of hi-tech artificial legs, as Lieutenant Garth Banks, 27, does after losing his lower limbs to a Taliban roadside bomb. The officer, from Leckhampton, Glos, said: “It’s been great. Steering this magnificent ship is something I never thought I would be doing.” Also aboard was Lance Corporal John Goggins, 26, from Bacup, Lancs, who suffered devastating leg wounds from a Taliban bullet. John said: “Everyone is so friendly and nobody makes much of a thing about being disabled.”

Guardsman Paul Bennett, 23, from St Austell, Cornwall, lost his leg below the knee and suffered hand injuries when an enemy improvised explosive device (IED) exploded. He has an artificial limb and uses a crutch. He said: “If anyone had told me I’d enjoy peeling spuds, you can guess what I’d have called them. But I am – this is great! What’s really important to all of us is that aboard this ship we are working in a team. That’s what we are used to in the Army…teamwork – and it is one of the things we have missed most since coming back from Afghanistan.”

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Mne Richards and Mne Jowett

One crewman said:

“They are heroes, though they wouldn’t thank you for saying it. Lord Nelson himself would have been proud to have men like these fellows in his crew.”

Veterans from 40 Commando, Royal Marines

“This is the best week we have had since we returned from Afghanistan” – Marine Jamie Jowett

“This voyage has been amazing; I’ve met many courageous people and made new friends… I am so glad I went on this voyage; it’s made me realise how lucky I am. I see others in a whole new light. I would feel privileged to sail again in the future.” – Marine Gareth Richards

Kyle Baker, a personal experience

Kyle Baker, 19 from Cheshire joined Tenacious on the 8th October 2010 for a tall ship adventure. Sailing from Canary Wharf, London, for an 8 day voyage, the ship stopped over in St. Malo, France, and returned to Southampton the following week.

Kyle is part of the famous Rifles, a regiment of the British Army, and was injured whilst serving in Afghanistan. His injury took place in Sangin whilst on patrol on Bonfire night in 2009. He was ambushed and has since lost the use of both of his legs. He now has to use sticks to get about and it’s taken him some time to adapt to his new civilian life.

“Sailing with the JST is a special experience, no matter what your physical disability, you are all classed the same whilst on board. I really enjoyed interacting with people of all ages and backgrounds which is so unlike everyday life. We had a fantastic sail all the way to France, even the captain was surprised. I wouldn’t hesitate to go on board again and suggest it to everyone, especially those returning from service in the army.”

Kyle Baker, The Rifles
Dr J A Hicklin has spent his professional life in rehabilitation and believes that his involvement with the Lord Nelson has been his most effective contribution.

“The voyages demystify the ‘disabled’ by turning them into people. It also has the effect of allowing the disabled to show off their strengths and put their weaknesses into context” – Dr J A Hicklin, JST Medical Director

In 2009 a group from Combat Stress and Battle Back joined us for a day sail, with very positive feedback and had this to say on reflection:

Amputee

“On behalf of myself and everyone who joined you yesterday, I would just like to say an enormous thank you to all your team for making the day so very successful.

I have been completely railroaded this morning with a ” full” account of the day , everyone talking at once and several of the men have said it was the best outing they have ever been on… Wonderful!”

“HUGE thank you … They have yet to take a breath talking about it!”

“I’ve been coming for twelve years and it was the best day out ever … The best day of my life.

Gill, Combat Stress

Master Corporal Paul Franklin lost both his legs in a suicide bombing in Kandahar back in January 2006. He set up the Northern Alberta Amputee Program (known as NAAP) which is a non-profit group established to enhance rehabilitation knowledge and care of people with amputation. He sailed on board Tenacious in 2011 and had this to say about the experience:

“Unique experience that was difficult at times but incredibly rewarding.”


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